Veterans


TO ALL RETURNING VETS, and their FAMILIES: DOES THIS STORY FIT
YOU?

March 03, 2012 06:06 PM EST (Updated: March 03, 2012 06:08 PM EST)

http://www.gather.com/viewArticle.action?articleId=281474981161680

submitted to Gather by: Gibbs Williams PH.D.

THE NEED for TIMELY EFFECTIVE INTERVENTION

As a recently returned
vet from Iraq or Afganistan does this story ring a bell?

You are severely wounded in mind and body requriring
effective treatment hopefully immediately. You register at the VA, meet with a social worker and a Doctor, given a
diagnosis of PTSD (post traumatic stress syndrome) and invited back for counseling. Hoping to see a counselor as
soon as possible you are disappointed with the news that your first counseling appointment will be in about 3
weeks. Hearing this, both you and your family members experience rising anxiety, tension, and frustration, fearing
you might not be able to wait that long maintaining a collective
 precarious sense of balance without exploding or
imploding.

To reduce your intense
negative feelings many like yourself will be given anti anxiety pills. The drugs may for some reduce the ‘sting’
but you are generally not told that it takes about two weeks for the drugs to get absorbed into your system so the
pills may or may not work well enough to meet your needs.

During this delay many
will find that the predictable reactions of anxiety, frustration, depression and stress – all natural not
pathological responses to unenviable human traumatic intrusions – will likely intensify.

What to many non
injured a delay of three weeks probably would seem to be no big deal – to the injured this time delay of only 21
days is often experienced as traumatically overwhelming.

Never a day goes by
when it is not reported that a returning Vet loses control and comitts outrageous actions.

What if the three week
delay could be notably shortened?

With this need in mind
I want to introduce you to a
revolutionary guide for both caring lay people and trained professionals wishing to be effective first
responders in helping those suffering from anxiety, depression, frustration and stress, often without the need for
drugs.

~Gibbs Williams PH.D.